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Commercials

most of the time commercials are bad because they don’t care about ethics since their root cause is to sell money. That’s their goal. It’s not to make society better. For a quick example, a commercial (a sprint ad about new wifi or something) i watched mere seconds ago portrayed a young daughter affectionately holding an iphone and saying “no I can watch my shows on my iphone wherever I go” ~ or something close. Good for the girl…. but the companies purpose was to PORTRAY the girl as happy, to portray it as ethically right… But what about the fact that parents actually do not want their kids spending so much time on mobile devices? What about the fact that kids already don’t want enough exercise, or the fact that they already have many things distracting them from schoolwork and shortening their attention spans? 

irishboyinlondon:

What makes a city intelligent? You do.

Walking an biking to elementary school used to be common. Now it`s rare. What happened? We started building fewer, bigger schools between neighborhoods. We built new wide roads to reduce congestion on the way to school. We thought schools would be safer away from Main Street, with its sidewalks of commerce and distractions. We can see the consequences now, making connections between those decisions and rising health problems. With better information, can we make our neighborhood intelligent? We can.
Text: Jan Gehl: Infographic by The National Building Museum in Washington DC

via carl-vs-karl:

irishboyinlondon:

What makes a city intelligent? You do.

Walking an biking to elementary school used to be common. Now it`s rare. What happened? We started building fewer, bigger schools between neighborhoods. We built new wide roads to reduce congestion on the way to school. We thought schools would be safer away from Main Street, with its sidewalks of commerce and distractions. We can see the consequences now, making connections between those decisions and rising health problems. With better information, can we make our neighborhood intelligent? We can.

Text: Jan Gehl: Infographic by The National Building Museum in Washington DC

via carl-vs-karl:

Reblogged from O the cheese

going into the election year…

It’s important to recognize that nobody can be perfect. I think ever since bush left people have been trying to find a god-like, perfect figure. No. That’s never going to happen. All the candidates are equal and human. I’m not promoting Obama, but people have been criticizing him too much. The truth is, no matter who is chosen as the next president they will be criticized just as much if everyone has expectations as high as the ones they had for Obama. 

Security

People might argue: “It’s safer in the suburb.”

And I might argue: “Sure, there’s definitely no hobos and stuff. But, if you get to know a lot of people who live around you in the city—instead of not even knowing your neighbor in the suburb, you would feel just as safe.”

Privacy

People might argue: “I don’t want to go live in a more compact city, I like the suburb; I get more privacy.”

And I might argue: “If you want privacy, why don’t you get your butt off facebook and stop being a fatty sitting in your giant suburban house alone in front of a computer screen.”

I think i have SAD. I thank the suburb for this.

Seasonal affective disorder

Depression - winter; SAD

Last reviewed: March 6, 2011.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is episodes of depression that occur at a certain time of the year, usually during winter.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

The disorder may begin during the teen years or in early adulthood. Like other forms of depression, it occurs more often in women than in men.

People who live in places with long winter nights are at greater risk for SAD. A less common form of the disorder involves depression during the summer months.

Other factors that may make SAD more likely include:

  • Amount of light

  • Body temperature

  • Genes

  • Hormones

Symptoms

Symptoms usually build up slowly in the late autumn and winter months. Symptoms are usually the same as with depression:

  • Increased appetite with weight gain (weight loss is more common with other forms of depression)

  • Increased sleep and daytime sleepiness (too little sleep is more common with other forms of depression)

  • Less energy and ability to concentrate in the afternoon

  • Loss of interest in work or other activities

  • Slow, sluggish, lethargic movement

  • Social withdrawal

  • Unhappiness and irritability

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002499/